Review: The Self-Publisher’s Ultimate Resource Guide

Self Pub Ultimate Review Guide

Just as you probably wouldn’t try to build your own house or fix the brakes on your car, it is almost never a good idea to try to be your own editor, proofreader, cover designer or indexer. Professionalism shows….

So says The Self-Publisher’s Ultimate Resource Guide, the book that is here to help you do just that: become a professional writer.

The Guide is well-organized into three sections: Prepare, Publish, Promote. Each section covers every resource you could possibly need on your self-publishing journey. I thought the whole book was well laid out and each section of the guide, and the sections within the sections, were clear, informative, and overflowing with recommendations.

That has definitely been a big problem for me as an indie writer: recommendations. I can do a Google search as fast as anyone, but how do you know if someone advertising their services is honest, cheap, efficient or good? Authors Joel Friedlander and Betty Kelly Sargent distill the choices for you (thought they do remind us to check recommendations, use contacts, and communicate openly).

Some might not like the idea of paying for a guide, an opinion I understand. Friedlander and Sargent have reduced but not eliminated the workload, and you may not want another expense. This guide is not for everyone, especially if you are comfortable with doing your own research (or have lots of time on your hands).

Other reviewers have noted that the word “guide” in the title is a little misleading. I agree with that. Before reading, I also assumed that the Guide would be a little meatier. Instead it is more a list of references. But I didn’t really have a problem with the list style because this is pretty similar to the Writer’s Market books. That said, some expansion would’ve been nice. For example, the Writer’s Conferences section would be a lot more useful with a breakdown of pricing/scholarship terms.

The Guide is also not suitable for people just starting to consider maybe someday self-publishing. It is not an instruction manual, it is a list of people who will help your completed novel get whipped into shape, published, and marketed. If you are not ready to go, your copy of this book will go out of date before you are ready to publish. Similar to the aforementioned Writer’s Market books, the information changes as people come and go, and if you are not ready to act, someone you want to work with may not be in business next year. You will get the most out of this guide if you are already ready to go, and have an idea of what you need.

Personally, I’m glad to have this reference book (full disclosure: I got it for free in exchange for an honest review) and believe it could be helpful to other writers. Just wait until you’re ready to get the most out of it.

 

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Resources for Scammed Writers

resources bp ss

Your manuscript is the One Ring, and unfortunately the publishing landscape is a little like trying to cross the Dead Marshes. (Sure, Gollum knows his way through, but can he be trusted?)

So here are two non-comprehensive lists to help you on your publishing quest. The first and most important part of surviving a scam is really just to avoid one in the first place. Do your research and you will save yourself a lot of time. For the poor souls who stray from the path, well, there’s help for you too. Read on for details.

For Avoiding Scams: 

Like I mentioned in my previous post, Absolute Write Water Cooler is one of my favorite places to go for tips on all areas of your writing business. The “Water Cooler” is actually the forum of Absolute Write, and I’ve found the mods and contributors there to be knowledgeable, willing to help, and not afraid to tell it like it is.

The one drawback of these forums is the chance that the threads will be old or unanswered. Another drawback is trying to judge a publisher/agency/editor based on many people’s opinions! For a simple, cut and dry approach to whether a place is reputable or not, try Preditors and Editors. Here, only about one line is devoted to each agency or publisher, and Preditors and Editors is clear on what they consider acceptable. Charges reading fee? “Not recommended.” Involved in a libel suit? “Strongly not recommended.” Pretty straightforward.

And lastly is SFWA’s Writer Beware. SFWA has been muddied by controversy for some time, but the website still has lots of great author resources, which you can access for free without supporting SFWA ;). The website is very user-friendly. I also recommend Victoria Strauss‘s stuff. She cofounded Writer Beware and is active on Absolute Write.

For Surviving Scams:

For your first stop you can head right on back to Writer Beware (or go there for the first time, since you wouldn’t have been scammed if you’d done your homework). They keep a running catalog of sketchy characters in the publishing world and welcome your contributions. Hand over your bad contracts and other materials so Writer Beware can add to their database and protect other writers.

Your next stop can be Writer Beware’s Legal Recourse and Other Remedies page. I would file a complaint on any relevant site, such as the Better Business Bureau. Remember, if nothing else, you have an ethical responsibility to try to protect other writers from scams. Do this by documenting your experience where others will see it.

And finally, if you are getting nowhere with whatever person/agency that scammed you, make use of legal aid like the Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts. It’s definitely worth at least a phone call, especially if you have already put a lot of money into the scam or if they are using your work/image against your consent. It’s one thing to waste time with a bad publishing house, it’s another to have this mistake haunt your professional career.

Don’t let scam artists get away with anything just because you feel overwhelmed. There are plenty of resources for you out there.

 

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How to Deal with Publishing Scams

The yellow is to cheer you up.

The yellow is to cheer you up.

Last year, members of my critique group and I decided to self-publish an anthology of science fiction and fantasy short stories. Nine of us wrote, edited, and compiled original stories. We ran a successful Indiegogo campaign; we met to discuss marketing plans: signings, press releases, how to utilize the “go-local” craze. Graphic designers in our group made an awesome cover, and we even broke down the legal details of our partnership.

Sounds like we had all of our bases covered, right?

Well, I wouldn’t be writing a post about scams if that were the case. Our original publisher was AuthorHouse. (Some of you will groan when you hear that name.) After discrepancies with our original contract vs the one they tried to hold us to months later, we dug a little deeper and found that many people were having or had had the same issues with AuthorHouse. Legal suits were ongoing, plenty of sites flagged the company as untrustworthy.

TC Spec

Our anthology, now due out in 2015

So, many wasted months and hundreds of dollars later, we decided to leave AuthorHouse. We’re not sure if we will be able to get our money back and our anthology has had its publication date pushed back further and further. Though we found a new service to format the book, a lot of trouble could have been avoided with a few simple changes.

1. No matter how experienced you think you are, always do your due diligence.

Whether you are self-publishing, agent-hunting, submitting to magazines, participating in contests, or whatever, you must do your research. Yes, this is the most basic of advice, but it is important to remember. I’ll use myself as an example. I’ve been submitting to agents and magazines for ten years. Two of my favorite sites are Absolute Write Water Cooler and Preditors and Editors. I consider spotting bad agents a skill of mine, and those two websites have been my support through my agent-hunting years. Then how did I miss such an obvious scam as AuthorHouse?

Basically, because we published in a group. Someone else suggested AuthorHouse and printed off prices that compared a few self-publishing presses. I assumed the contract had been looked over, and no one else brought it up. Because I was in a new situation (self-pub vs agents) and in a group, I did not do my due diligence. Turns out, no one else in the group had either.

2. Take context into consideration.

If a traditional publishing house asked for a $500 reading fee before accepting you, you would know that was way too much money and back away slowly from the offer. But what about a $10 reading fee from an agent? Or a $15 entrance fee for a contest? That’s not too much money, and winning that contest could get you noticed by your dream agent! (Who represents Suzanne Collins, again?)

There’s no hard-and-fast rule about paying for services. Many people will tell you not to pay to enter a contest, but then there’s Glimmer Train. Self publishing was villainized not even ten years ago, but now respectable people pay to publish all the time. (Pretty much everyone will tell you never go with an agent who charges reading fee.) You will have to take context into consideration when making your decisions. If the only place you’ve heard of Glimmer Train is this blog just now, you probably shouldn’t submit there. Word of mouth is not a reliable way to choose who to work with. Look for a consistent track record of successful authors and happy customers. If this information is hard to find, go somewhere else. If customers disagree on whether the company is good to work with or not, go somewhere else.

3. If you are scammed, take action.

I can say one thing for my anthology group: once we knew about the scam, we rallied. Everybody chose one new publisher/press and researched it. We presented our findings and checked and double-checked before making a decision. We assigned one person to take on AuthorHouse and try and get our money back (we’re still in limbo). We’re discussing small claims court and revitalizing our marketing.

Your first task, whether working in a group or alone, should be to secure the rights to your work. Your money may be gone down a black hole but with persistence you should be able to get back your rights. After that, you can start considering options. Don’t worry about a smaller budget or a slower timetable. Your priority should be getting back on the right track.

This post is the first in a short series on publishing scams, so check back tomorrow for more details on avoiding and surviving scams.

 

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How to Make Pinterest Character and Story Boards

This image may not be 100% related to post content...

This image may not be 100% related to post content…

The title to this sounds like an instructional, but I’m really asking a question.

I’ve seen character and novel boards on Pinterest from a lot of other authors, and thought it was a cool idea at first. That’s why I decided to make my own. I have two Pinterest boards just for my novels, TURQUOISEBLOOD and DANA (here’s DANA below for reference).

Let’s use TURQUOISEBLOOD as an example. The novel takes place in the mountain country of Rak, where an albino village girl named Kiri takes up with the rogue dragon Anya to solve a murder. Their journey takes them to Rak’s lowlands, royal court, and deep into the mountains. At the same time, we learn the story of Pristina, fighting to stop a civil war in Rak 200 years before Kiri’s birth.

Because of this, my Pinterest board has pins of mountains, dragons, white-haired girls, and lots of clothing. But it suggests nothing of the narrative of the story, that there’s a mystery, a parallel storyline, or even other characters. Because of the changing fashion in the areas Kiri and Anya travel to, the clothing styles don’t have any consistency to anyone but me.

These two boards don’t have many followers. Likewise, I find myself less interested in other writer’s story/character boards. If I haven’t read the book, or if it’s unpublished (TURQUOISEBLOOD will be out in 2015!) then it’s harder for me to enjoy these kinds of boards.

In order to improve mine (New Year’s Resolution time?), I’m going to try out some new things:

1) Create a better narrative by writing more description in the header and on the pins.

2) Reshuffle pins so they more closely follow events of the novel.

3) Find more ways to pin to these boards. After all, the more you pin the more followers you get!

What about you? Has anyone seen an example of a good story-Pinterest board? Let me know what you’ve seen/done before! And send me your name so I can follow you on Pinterest 🙂

 

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